shaggyshan

joodlez:

Hello! As many of you have been made aware, I’ve been busy working away on this Ravio-centred Link Between Worlds fanbook: Two Worlds ◆ Two Heroes. It’s a fully illustrated book of self-indulgent headcanons, such as the ones I’ve been posting on tumblr

Product Details:
▼ soft cover
▼ B5 (approximately 7x10”)
▼ 24 pages
▼ full colour
▼ illustrations and mini comics (1-3 pages per segment)

Shipping Details:
▼ $4.00 Within Canada 
▼ $6.00 To United States 
▼ $10.00 Internationally

Preorder Bonus:
▼ an exclusive mini-print! 
▼ a randomized 20 orders (1 order = 1 book) get a double-sided clear acrylic RavioLi charm! Yay!!

I’m making an effort to have this available at Anime North 2014 at earliest, but if the books don’t make it by then, it will be available at Anime Expo 2014 and online. I don’t have plans on going to a Vancouver convention this year. If you plan on buying a copy at these abovementioned conventions, please do not purchase online, for there will be no pick-ups. Thank you everyone for your interest and support, I really appreciate it!! ;-;

(The books are already in production hehe!!) 

tenacious-dingo
ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

wilwheaton

maxistentialist:

The American Reader:

I have a fun game/exercise that I play with my rhetoric classes. I pick a seemingly innocuous phrase that is (over-)used in mass media, then I ask the class to explain what it means. No matter what they say, I either pretend not to understand, or ask…